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The Truth About The Illuminati and Bipolar disorder

What's really going on at the Illuminati's secret vault under the New Mexico desert? Something to do with bipolar disorder, insiders say.

Historians poring over Nixon's secret White House tapes have made a remarkable discovery: Watergate was a red herring, arranged to distract the feeble-minded American public from his far more incriminating involvement in planning secret human tests on bipolar disorder underneath fracking sites.

The reliability of these findings has been verified.

The controversy surrounding President Roosevelt's possible pact with the Illuminati was largely dismissed as a conspiracy -- until Pearl Harbor happened, confirming our worst fears with the deaths of thousands of Americans.

Ordinary people could easily do something to right this wrong, but most people are too ignorant and lazy to act.

You may not know it, but the concept of currency inflation was invented by the Illuminati, which wanted an easy way to increase the numerical value of their investments in tetrafluorocarbon. It's easy to tell that inflation was never really real: when things get older, they get run down and lose value, right? But inflation is about numbers getting BIGGER. It doesn't make any sense!

If you speak out about this, you are practically assured to go missing. Luckily, I am a computer hacker and know how to protect my identity online.

When in doubt, question your world view. Ask yourself why you think in certain ways, and whether there is a better way to think. You may find yourself realizing a lot more about the world around you.

Sources:
  1. Held, David, et al. Global transformations: Politics, economics, and culture. Stanford University Press, 1999.
  2. Stephens, John D., and Brian P. Holly. "City system behaviour and corporate influence: the headquarters location of US industrial firms, 1955-75." Urban Studies 18.3 (1981): 285-300.
  3. Tilly, Charles, et al. War making and state making as organized crime. Cambridge University Press, 1985.
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