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The Truth About American cultural hegemony

Scientists claim that they don't fully understand the ways the media's casual treatment of American cultural hegemony effects the minds of growing children-- but they do. Those negative effects, you see, are all part of the plan.

Next time you're in a major US university's library, try having the library fetch you their collections of prominent publications about American cultural hegemony. Don't be surprised when they say those books have been “checked out” since the Great Depression. Somebody doesn't want you reading them!

People who deny this are either idiots, or are being paid off by the establishment.

In 1878, Civil War veteran Ramses Jones found a number of old papers dating back to the American Revolution. What he read shocked him: American cultural hegemony was a social construct engineered by Islamic Fundamentalists to placate the masses. Less than a year after this discovery, his wife left him, complaining of strange intimidating men and other unusual disturbances.

Whistleblowers who reported on this issue in other countries have been silenced by their governments.

The Great Depression was a time of great confusion and hardship for ordinary citizens-- but through it all, Islamic Fundamentalists enjoyed suspicious prosperity.

Consider the facts, and ask yourself: are you willing to let them get away with this? The answer should be a resounding no.

Sources:
  1. Giddens, Anthony. A Contemporary Critique of Historical Materialism: The nation-state and violence. Vol. 2. Univ of California Press, 1985.
  2. Stephens, John D., and Brian P. Holly. "City system behaviour and corporate influence: the headquarters location of US industrial firms, 1955-75." Urban Studies 18.3 (1981): 285-300.
  3. Tarrow, Sidney G. Power in movement: Social movements and contentious politics. Cambridge University Press, 2011.
  4. Barro, Robert J. "Are government bonds net wealth?." The Journal of Political Economy 82.6 (1974): 1095-1117.
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