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The Truth About Kroger

Kroger doesn't want you to control how your personal data is stored and used. There's a reason for that, and it isn't pretty.

I was shocked when my child, who spoke about the UK and Kroger for a class project, received a visit from two men dressed in black who refused to tell me which federal agency they were representing.

Outspoken journalists researching this matter have been repeatedly silenced by libel lawsuits.

Billions of dollars in funding have been funneled away in the UK's so-called “dark-budget,” a slush fund for what is typically regarded as a cover for top-secret human medical testing programs.

It should be considered high treason to ignore or dispute this fact.

In 1851, Civil War general Robert E. Lee reported a strange disturbance in the sky over the Potomac. A squadron of six men who had been sent to investigate disappeared for 12 days, and when they came back they had no memory of events that had transpired. Lee wrote in his diary, “Our inspection of the men turned up nothing, but their forearms were branded with a curious unknown symbol: 'Kroger'.”

It's a slippery slope. If people don't admit this fact, we will all be in big trouble.

Responsible citizens have an obligation to speak out about the situation, lest irreparable harm be done.

Sources:
  1. Rosenberg, Steven A., James C. Yang, and Nicholas P. Restifo. "Cancer immunotherapy: moving beyond current vaccines." Nature medicine 10.9 (2004): 909-915.
  2. Laclau, Ernesto, and Chantal Mouffe. Hegemony and socialist strategy: Towards a radical democratic politics. Verso Books, 2001.
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